Australia's Decision to Kill 10,000 Camels Because They Drink Excess Water Amid The Severe Bushfire Crisis Sparks Outrage on Twitter
Australia killing camels (Photo Credits: Pixabay, Twitter)

Australia is struggling to brave against the wild bushfires which have swiped out hectares of land. Among all the distressing reports of lost lives, damaged property and a loss of over a million animals, the authorities have made another decision to kill 10,000 camels. The reason given is, these animals are drinking a lot of water and causing trouble to the residents living in the drought-affected regions. The government has planned to begin a five-day campaign to kill almost 10,000  camels by shooting them from helicopters! The move has been slammed by many people on social media with even petitions being signed to save the camels. Australia Bushfire Donations: Here’s How You Can Donate and Help Those Affected by Destructive Australian Wildfires.

The planned cull is supposed to executed starting Wednesday in South Australia. A severe drought condition in the region has forced the camels to search for water and vegetation. Aboriginal leaders in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) have authorized these killings sighting these animals are a threat considering its also one of the worst bushfire seasons in Australian history. However, ecologists and people alike have slammed the move and are shocked at the audacity of such a decision. Australia Bushfire Crisis: PM Scott Morrison Announces 2 Billion Dollars for Relief Support.

Check Some Tweets Against Australia's Decision to Cull Camels:

Outrageous!

Sense the Hypocrisy?

When Will We Accept Our Fault

Who is The Biggest Monster?

Shame on Australia

Somebody Stop This!

People even pointed out that camels were brought into the country in the 1800s for assistance in construction and development. Australia is thus a home to the camels over the years. Meanwhile, the estimate of total animal loss including amphibians, bats, and invertebrates, insects may reach over a billion in the Australian bushfires.