Bumps on the Vagina – Is It Razor Rash or STD? 3 Signs It’s a Sexually Transmitted Disease

The skin of your vagina is undoubtedly the most delicate of your entire anatomy. It’s only obvious for it to be a target for infections and issues from breakouts to razor rash to even serious problems like genital warts and herpes. So when a suspicious spot, lump or bump suddenly shows up down below, it may not be a great idea to simply blow it off thinking that it is something minor. For all you know, it could be a symptom of something bigger that could pose a serious threat to your health. So the next time you see a bump on your vagina, check for these three factors.

1. The Bump Hurts Badly

If the bump causes mild discomfort and is tender to touch, it is probably a harmless whitehead or ingrown hair. Genital warts don’t cause pain either but the worry could be herpes if you see blisters that hurt badly and even burn when you urinate. So better check with the doctor if the bump hurts. Find out if you can get STD from oral sex and how to stay safe. 

2. The Bump Is Jagged

A smooth, painless bump hanging out of the skin is probably just a skin tag. Skin tags are super common in areas where skin rubs against the skin like the upper thighs. However, if the bump feels jagged and rough like cauliflower, it is probably genital warts. Genital warts is caused by HPV virus and is transmitted via skin-on-skin sexual contact. While genital warts won’t cause anything serious, you still need to check with your gyno for the best way to treat it.

3. The Bump Is Open

If your bumps are closed and remain closed until they heal, they are most likely razor bumps, a rash or a zit. However, if it is a painless bump on both sides of the vagina beneath the skin, it could well be Bartholin’s cyst which is caused when one of the glands lubricated by the vagina is clogged. You don’t have to really worry as it is harmless, often the size of a pea and goes away on its own. Every woman should take these medical tests in their 20s, 30s and 40s. 

On the other hand, herpes blisters start out as closed red bumps and open within days before they turn moist and oozy. If that is what you are experiencing, you should positively consult your doctor so that she can recommend tests and prescribe medicines accordingly.

Prevention is always better than cure and while there is no point being a hypochondriac it is always a good idea to be in the know-how of the symptoms.