World AIDS Day 2019 Date and Theme: Significance And History Related to the Day That Creates Awareness About HIV Infection
World AIDS Day (Photo Credits: Pixabay)

World AIDS Day is observed on December 1 annually since 1988 to raise awareness about AIDS pandemic caused by HIV infection. The day also remembers those who died due to the disease. Governments, health official, non-governmental organisations try observing the day educating people on AIDS prevention and control. AIDS is the abbreviation for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. World AIDS Day is one of the eight official global public health campaigns. The theme for World AIDS Day 2019 is 'Ending the HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Community by Community'. What’s The Difference Between HIV and AIDS?

According to the World Health Organisation, an estimated 37,900,000 are living with HIV at the end of 2018. Last year, 1,700,000 people were newly infected with HIV in 2018 and 770,000 died of HIV-related causes. At the end of 2018, out of 37.9 million people living with HIV 79% received testing, 62% received treatment, and 53% had achieved suppression of the HIV virus with reduced risk of infecting others. The numbers were even more last year, however, with improved access to antiretroviral treatment, the death rate from AIDS epidemic has decreased since 2005.

World AIDS Day History And Significance

World AIDS Day was visualised by the Thomas Netter and James W Bunn in 1987. The public information officers from Geneva in Switzerland had shared the idea about AIDs day to Dr Jonathan Mann who approved it and recommended the observance of World AIDS Day on December 1 in 1988. The day began to be celebrated on a wide scale in 1996 and in 2004, the World AIDS Campaign became an independent organisation. The day garnered further attention in 2007 after the White House marked the observance by displaying an 8.5 m AIDS Ribbon on the building's North Portico. HIV Infection Ups Risk of Heart Failure, Stroke.

World AIDS Day tries to motivate patients and families of those affected by HIV to ensure that they are not alone in their fight against the disease. The observance is also to end discrimination against people with HIV/AIDs and to end the biasness towards their family.  While medical science has advanced making treatment available for the disease, many do not access to the tests, treatment or medication. People wear Red Ribbons on their clothes to show solidarity with people affected by HIV. It acts as a symbol of awareness and support. People also sell red ribbons to raise funds to provide support to those battling with the disease.