Colourful Louis Vuitton Hair Braids Go Viral, Could they be the Next Big Instagram Fashion Trend in 2019?
Louis Vuitton Hair Braids (Photo Credits: Magnus Juliano Instagram)

An aspiring designer and rapper Magnus Juliano's newest hair braids has struck a chord with fashion lovers on the internet. Magnus merged the iconic Louis Vuitton logo with his braids giving it all new feel and look. Internet users were all praises for the man's creative incorporation of the logos. The Louis Vuitton charms were made with a 3D Printer in Eat Crow Studio. Styled by Ciera Jackson, Magnus reportedly said that it took six months to create and finalise it. 10 styles from the 80s and the 90s that have made a comeback AND HOW!

He had to try it multiple times to ensure it fits him well. He told Vogue that the Louis Vitton braids are a symbol of tribute to African-American roots and to Vuitton designer Virgil Abloh. Magnus is known for experimenting with his braids often. His Instagram photos show his posing with different style braids including colourful feathers and beads. He has also tied one with LEGO building blocks, yes you read it right! He attaches these fancy items at the end of his hair making heads turn. Flower Vase Hair Is the Latest ‘Floral’ Hair Trend and It Is Sweeping Instagram and Twitter (View Pics)

Check out Magnus' Louis Vuitton inspired hair braids:

 

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He said that the idea struck him last June and has been working on it since then.

 

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After a lot of trial and error method, it was finalised.

 

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He also told Vogue, "African-American roots are rich in hair jewellery and headdress—it's our fabric. I chose [to pay tribute to] Louis Vuitton because of the impact [the brand has] had on art and design, but from the perspective of designers like Dapper Dan, who didn't have access to [luxury brands], yet still made hip-hop couture using their likeness."