Rail Accident Victim Tejashree Vaidya Discharged After A Brave 5-Month-Long Battle in Intensive Care
After a Long 5 month Battle in Intensive Care, Rail Accident Victim Tejashree Vaidya Discharged (Photo: Fortis Hospital)

For the family of 23yr old aspiring journalist, Tejashree Vaidya, the past five months have been traumatic and overwhelming. On April 20th, Tejashree was travelling by the local train to attend her last examination. It was between Sion and Matunga stations when the young woman fell off from the overcrowded CST- bound train. A teacher travelling with her at the time immediately informed the Railway Protection Force (RPF), who rescued her and took her to a civic hospital. Man Falls Off From Speeding Nanded-Bengaluru Express Train, Watch Horrific Accident Video.

Brought in a critical condition, she was immediately administered necessary first aid. Admitted under the care of Dr Batuk Diyora, Consultant Neurosurgeon, she was diagnosed with Traumatic and Hypoxic Brain Injury; in view of her poor neurological status, Tejashree was put on a ventilator, parallelly, antibiotic treatment commenced. After consulting with his team, Dr Diyora decided that Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) be administered to the young patient who was in Coma (i.e. she was not in her senses and was maintaining only basic vital functions).

HBOT treatment was planned and the patient was moved to SL Raheja Hospital, Mahim-A Fortis Associate, under the care of Dr Amit Nabar, Consultant Critical Care, HOD-Accident & Emergency, Hyperbaric Medicine, and Dr Batuk Diyora, at the hospital. Here, effective treatment options were considered in consultation with Dr Kaustubh Mahajan, Consultant Neurologist and Dr Paritosh Baghel, Consultant Physician & Specialist-Internal Medicine. After 32 cycles of HBOT, intensive medical management and Physiotherapy, Neuro Rehabilitation, and good nursing care, her condition improved, and she gained consciousness. Woman Slips From Moving Train At Kanjurmarg Station, Mumbai After Her Saree Gets Entangled At The Door; RPF Constable Averts The Mishap

Speaking about the preferred therapy option, Dr Amit Nabar, Consultant Critical Care, HOD-Accident & Emergency, Hyperbaric Medicine, SL Raheja Hospital, Mahim-A Fortis Associate, said, “Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a non-invasive medical treatment that improves the normal healing process of the body by inhalation of 100% Oxygen at an increased atmosphere pressure. This allows Oxygen to dissolve in the fluid component of the body, aiding increased oxygen supply to the tissues, helping bring down Brain Edema (swelling). Considering Tejashree’s condition, we decided to administer HBOT which is emerging finding a role in the healing and recovery of patients with traumatic brain injury”.

 Talking about Tejashree’s brain injury, Dr Kaustubh Mahajan, Consultant Neurologist, SL Raheja Hospital, Mahim-A Fortis Associate, said, “Her brain injury was severe, mainly Diffused Axonal Injury, which means her brain had rapidly shifted inside the skull due to the injury. Here the brain gets displaced from its natural position and all the fibres connected to the brain are disrupted. Hence, these patients remain unresponsive and in a vegetative state for a longer duration. She is now fully alert, responding well and can move her limbs which she was unable to do before. We are happy for Tejashree and her family”.

 Amidst much fanfare, Tejashree went home with her parents during Ganpati, her father Mr Ram Vaidya said, “My daughter’s health has significantly improved. Bring our daughter back home during Ganpati, was like a blessing from the Lord himself; our prayers came true. Constant support and encouragement from our family, friends helped us sail through this difficult phase. Financial aid coming in from the hospital, and from our well-wishers in the community, has been of tremendous help”.

 On her current condition post a rigorous 5-month ordeal, Dr Paritosh Baghel, Consultant Physician & Specialist-Internal Medicine, SL Raheja Hospital, Mahim-A Fortis Associate, added, “Her condition is now stable with an improvement in senses; she can now obey simple verbal commands, moves all four limbs, track eyes to source of noise or on calling her name, and eats semisolid food.  She will, however, require intense Physiotherapy and good nursing care to recover faster and fully”.