CV Raman Death Anniversary: Twitterati Remembers the Physicist Who Won Nobel Prize for Physics in 1930
CV Raman (Photo Credits: File Photo)

Physicist  CV Raman who is known for his contributions in the field on light was the first Indian to receive The Nobel Prize in the field of Physics. He received the honour for his work 'The Raman Effect' in 1930. At 42, Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman also became the first Asian to receive the prize in the field of science. Today on his death anniversary, people have taken to Twitter remembering the great mind and his contributions to science and the country.

In 1917, Raman quit his government service and was appointed the first Palit Professor of Physics at the University of Calcutta. Raman had asked the Government of India to provide more for the growth of scientific institutions in the country. In his Nobel lecture, Raman said that "a voyage to Europe in the summer of 1921 gave me the first opportunity of observing the wonderful blue opalescence of the Mediterranean Sea." On his death anniversary, politicians, celebrities, commoners have all taken to Twitter wishing the

Here are some of the tweets:

In 1948, he became the director of Raman Research Institute in Bangalore, he held the position until his death on November 21, 1970.

He was honoured with Bharat Ratna, the highest civilian honour in India in 1954.

In 1989, director Nandan Kudhyadi made a biopic on his life 'C.V. Raman: The Scientist And His Legacy' that won national awards.

February 28th has been declared as National Science Day by the Indian Government to commemorate his work.

He has also been conferred upon him with a knighthood by the Royal Society, London (1929), Lenin Peace Prize (1957), Franklin Medal (1941), among others.

Raman passed his matriculation at the age of 11 with first class. He also received a scholarship after passing his intermediate exam at the age of 13. In 1904, he completed his graduation from the University of Madras with a gold medal. He also has an MSc degree with the highest distinction from the same university. He passed away at the age of 84 on November 21, 1970.