Transgender Day of Remembrance 2019 Date: History and Significance of the Day That Remembers People Killed in Transphobic Events
Transgender Day of Remembrance (Photo Credits: Wikipedia, Pixabay)

Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) or International Transgender Day of Remembrance is observed annually on November 20 in the memory of those who have been murdered in activities related to transphobia. The day tries to highlight the violence faced by transgender people. It was founded by Gwendolyn Ann Smith, a transgender woman in 1999. She introduced the day to memorialise the murder of transgender woman Rita Hester in Allston, Massachusetts.  In 2010, the day was observed in over 185 cities throughout more than 20 countries. Across countries, events, candle and vigil marches are held remembering those who lost their lives due to deeply-rooted taboos and superstitions embedded in the society. Scotland Becomes 1st Country in The World to Embed LGBTQ Inclusive Education in School Curriculum.

Rita Hester was a transgender African American woman who was murdered in Allston, Massachusetts on November 28, 1998. The incident saw an outpouring of grief and anger among citizens, especially the transgender community. Following which, a candlelight vigil was held on December 4 in which about 250 people participated. Incidents related to death was widely covered by local newspapers. Her death inspired the 'Remembering Our Dead' web project giving birth to the Transgender Day of Remembrance. Pervert Man Sends Picture of His Penis to Transgender Woman, Her Reply With Photo of Her 'Bigger' Genitals is Winning The Internet (Check Viral Tweet)

Transgender Day of Remembrance highlights transphobic violence related to race, gender and class endured by people of the community. It honours all transgender people who have lost their lives due to anti-transgender violence. These vigils and candlelight marches are typically held by local transgender groups at parks, places of worship, community centres and other similar places. These vigils and candlelight marches are typically held by local transgender groups at parks, places of worship, community centres and other similar places. The day also tries to show how transphobic violence are inherently connected to race, gender, and class.