Tobacco Can Help Treat Diabetes, Stroke and Arthritis, Says New Study
Tobacco plants (Photo Credits: Pixabay)

Toronto, Feb 27: Tobacco plants can be used as 'green bioreactors' to produce a potentially powerful therapeutic that could treat a number of disorders like diabetes, stroke, dementia and arthritis, scientists say.The plants are being used to produce large quantities of a human protein called Interleukin 37, or IL-37.

The protein is naturally produced in the human kidney in very small quantities and has powerful anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressing properties, providing potential for treating a number of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders like type 2 diabetes, stroke, dementia and arthritis. Cigarette Packets Warning: Tobacco Products to Carry New Grave Images From September 1; Check Pictures.

"This protein is a master regulator of inflammation in the body, and has been shown in pre-clinical models to be effective in treating a whole host of diseases," said Tony Jevnikar, a professor at Western University in Canada.

"The human kidney produces IL-37, but not nearly enough to get us out of an inflammation injury," said Jevnikar.

While showing promise in animal models, IL-37's use clinically has been limited because of the inability to produce it in large quantities at a price that is feasible clinically.

Currently, it can be made in very small amounts using the bacteria E.Coli, but at a very high cost. The research is the first of its kind to demonstrate that this functional human protein can be produced in plant cells.

"The plants offer the potential to produce pharmaceuticals in a way that is much more affordable than current methods," said Shengwu Ma, an Adjunct Professor at Western University.

"Tobacco is high-yield, and we can temporarily transform the plant so that we can begin making the protein of interest within two weeks," said Ma.

The study, published in the journal Plant Cell Reports, that the protein can be extracted and quantified from the plant cells in a way that maintains its function.

Researchers are investigating the effect that IL-37 has for preventing organ injury during transplantation. When an organ is removed for transplantation and then transferred to a recipient, inflammation occurs when the blood flow is restored to the organ. He and his team believe IL-37 provides a way to prevent that injury.