Cartoonist Gahan Wilson Passes Away at 89; Twitterati Remember His Offbeat Artwork Portraying Horror, Fantasy And Dark Comedy!
Gahan Wilson (Photo Credits: Getty Images, Twitter, Artwork by Cartoonist Gahan Wilson)

Gahan Wilson, the critically acclaimed cartoonist passed away at the age of 89. Known for his offbeat, the cartoonist will be remembered for his work in publications like The New Yorker, Collier and Playboy. His comic strip 'Nuts' was a regular feature in National Lampoon. Wilson is survived by his two stepsons, daughter-in-law, as well as eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He is preceded in death by his wife, Nancy Winters Wilson. Born in Evanston, Illinois, on February 18, 1930, Gahan Wilson's horror-inspired cartoons and stories were a hit back then. He also created the comic strip 'Nuts' darker and 'Peanuts' which ran in National Lampoon magazine. After the cartoonist's death, people have taken to Twitter sharing his cartoons and artwork. Sudarsan Pattnaik Selected for Italian Golden Sand Art Award 2019.

A GoFundMe page was set up for Wilson’s medical care following. The page describes Wilson's wife as "his rock. His guide through the world. While we all helped with his care, it was my mother who grounded him. He is currently distraught and out of sorts with the world." According to the page, Wilson and his wife had been living in a medical care facility in Arizona together. Wilson married to author Nancy Winters from 1966 until her death on March 2, 2019. He was diagnosed with dementia.

Twitter Shares Gahan Wilson's Cartoons Remembering the Artist:

Gahan Wilson Cartoon!

Life of Horror!

RIP, Gahan Wilson!

A Comic Strip From Nuts!

Hilarious and Horrifying!

Creepy Yet Creative!

Defining What's Happening On The Inside!

In 2009, Wilson illustrated an animated version of Neil Gaiman's 'It Was a Dark and Silly Night' ahead of a New Yorker for the magazine. The 2013 documentary Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird included A-list cast of creators and media icons including Gaiman, Stan Lee, Guillermo del Toro, and Hugh Hefner who tried to explain how Wilson's artistry despite being dark and offbeat resonated with such a wide category of readers over the decades.